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Hello!

We have revised our Code of Conduct based on everyone's feedback in this thread! Please go through the new version. After final amendments, discussion is now closed and the latest version will be added as part of the official Ranking Criteria.

Old announcement
As announced at this thread, me and JBHyperion (95% him) have been working on a Code of Conduct that is supposed to apply across the entire ecosystem of Mapping and Modding. Most of these things can be considered as "common sense", however, we felt like we need to explicitely write down this CoC in order to remind people that they are interacting with people and that we want people to stay civil. Additionally, we want to draw a line of where we might see future behavior violations when it comes to fights and misconduct in individual beatmap cases.

Therefore, we propose to put this Code of Conduct on top of the General Ranking Criteria, in order to give it the rightful place of an all-applying behavior ruleset to ensure civil and proper discussion, suggestion making and replying to such.

For sure, before we amend this, we want your feedback on that. You will have 1 week to file your feedback for this matter. At the 1. May 2016, we will lock down this discussion and apply the feedback and then put up a final revision, before we amend this set of rules to the Ranking Criteria once and for all.


So here we go:

Behaviour and Conduct

  • The goal of modding is to help a mapper improve their work so that it can be pushed towards Ranked status if the mapper chooses to do so. If you're not interested in helping people, steer clear of the discussion to avoid hurting them.
  • When modding, consider who the post is directed at, what you aim to achieve by posting and what response you expect to receive. This will ensure your best intentions are conveyed and your post is easy to understand.
    • Don’t shy away from new mappers and modders - these people are the ones who can benefit the most from your input! Be patient, understanding, and provide as much explanation as possible so that they can learn and improve more quickly
    • If you’re new yourself, don’t be afraid to say so! This will allow more experienced community members to point you in the right direction. Everyone was new and in your position once!
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated. People are more receptive to kind, helpful suggestions than hostile ones. Try to understand others’ point-of-view rather than attack it - nobody likes to feel worthless, incompetent or stupid. If you are a masochist, assume that all others are not.
  • If you wish to comment on or discuss a beatmap, go to that beatmap’s thread - not social media outlets, or the Disqus comments section (if the map is Qualified), as it is unlikely your concerns will be heard by anyone with the power to address them appropriately.
  • Personal attacks, hateful comments, misplaced joking, derailing the thread and general drama-initiation are not acceptable in any form and will not be tolerated.

Making a Mod Post

So you downloaded a map and you've thought of some things you aren't happy with - now's the time to put your thoughts to words and help improve the map. But how can you get the mapper to see your point of view, test your suggestions and give you feedback? After all, no-one likes feeling that their time has been wasted.
  • Before modding, ensure your intentions are good and you are focused on the task at hand. No-one likes to receive a rude or lazy mod.
  • When making suggestions, try to differentiate between what is intersubjectively / objectively bad or wrong, and what you simply dislike on a personal level. All types of suggestion are fine as long as they are put forward accordingly.
    • Objective Issues - Prohibited by rulesets and must be fixed.
    • Intersubjective Issues - Not prohibited by rulesets, but are agreed upon as being “wrong” by a majority of people. Should be fixed in most cases unless there are opposing intersubjective arguments with equal size, or if the mapper can exhaustively explain why they feel it is acceptable
    • Subjective Issues - Something that you believe or think on a personal level. Might become intersubjective if many people agree with it.
  • Unless the concept behind a beatmap is fundamentally flawed from the start, modding should aim to improve the map in it’s current design - not force your own style upon it. If you truly believe the map has too many significant issues to address individually, try to give a general statement of why this is the case and what direction you think the map should go in to get back on track.
  • When pointing out "issues", inspect each thoroughly consider exactly what it is about the particular "thing" you dislike. Then, try to offer a potential solution or improvement and consider exactly how that suggestion will improve the map. If necessary, try multiple suggestions to see which work best - The more help you can offer the mapper, the better.
Suggestions themselves should ideally consist of four main parts, though based on the experience of the mapper and/or your personal relationship to them, you may want to be more lenient:
  1. A statement of the issue itself and where it can be found - including a timestamp is a huge help so that the mapper can find the part in question quickly.
  2. A brief explanation of why this causes a problem - this is essential in convincing a mapper to even consider your suggestion. Mappers are much more receptive to criticism and change when it's accompanied by clear, understandable and valid reasoning.
  3. One or more alternative suggestions, accompanied by explanations of how they address the problem(s) - much like the above, explanation is key here. Even if you can convince the mapper that their current work can be improved, what makes your suggestion better than theirs, or anyone else's?
  4. The wording (or even language) used should take the mapper into consideration. Are they a fluent English speaker? If not, stick to simple and easy-to-understand language. If you both speak the same language, by all means write in that language, but try to append an English summary of your mods and mod replies if possible, to ensure everyone stays on the same page. If necessary, support your suggestions with screenshots, illustrations, or even short video clips to help get your point across.
There are any number of ways to present your mod post, so feel free to experiment, but try to keep the visuals simple and formatted in a way that it is easy for the mapper and others to work with.

Responding to a Mod

Someone just posted some suggestions on your map, great! - but it doesn't end there. For the record, it's necessary to give a proper response for two major reasons. Firstly, so that future mods can be tailored more specifically to your concept or style, resulting in fewer unhelpful suggestions. Secondly, just as a mod post helps you to improve your mapping ability, providing a detailed mod response helps the modder improve their modding ability, meaning they gain experience and can provide more helpful and detailed mods in the future. You never know who you may need to ask for a mod next time around!

  • Treat all suggestions as valid and equally important until you have thoroughly inspected and tested them - even minor stylistic changes or alternative viewpoints can help improve the quality of a beatmap
  • As with making a mod post, be sure to explain yourself as much as possible. State what you changed, and if you didn’t accept the suggestion for some reason, explain why and what you did instead.
  • When declining a suggestion, remain calm and professional, say what needs to be said in order to explain yourself and leave it at that. No matter how impolite, confusing or unhelpful the suggestion was, getting angry and responding with hostility, sarcasm, etc. will not help the situation.
  • BNs and QATs will review previous mods before placing any icons and may want to initiate or revisit discussions during their checks. Any assistance you can provide as to why you did or didn’t do something takes very little effort, and could be a huge help to all parties later on.

Further Exchange and Discussion

Sometimes, a single mod and response isn't enough to bring all parties to agreement, or fully resolve an issue. Perhaps the mapper doesn't agree with a suggestion, and the modder isn't satisfied with their response. Alternatively, both parties might agree that although one option is better, it isn't the best option and could still be improved further with additional input. Continued feedback is the best way to improve a beatmap, so get people involved and talking to get as many different ideas, or see things from as many points of view as necessary.

  • If you’re unsure about something, ask the person in question to explain what they meant. They should be more than willing to explain things to you in more detail.
  • Still can’t reach an agreement? Ask someone with more experience, such as a BN or QAT. Remember they are busy people, however!
    Should you realise there's a more suitable alternative to something you originally suggested, don't be afraid to put your pride aside - sometimes being wrong can be far more valuable than being right.
  • There is no such things as a "wrong" opinion - it's up to the mapper and modders to come to an agreement in a civil manner - try to understand alternative points of view rather than attack them, as you never know when it might be useful in the future.
  • If you can't explain something through logic, you will not be able to explain it to them through violence either. Rather than continue a discussion that isn’t progressing, walk away and try again with the next modder/mapper.
  • When things look to be getting out of hand, or of the discussion is struggling to stay on topic, call a moderator - don't contribute to the problem by continuing to post.

Qualified Mapsets

The Qualified section allows mapsets to receive any final suggestions for change or improvement before reaching Ranked status. When modding a Qualified map, everything you consider “not minor” should always be mentioned - minor issues are also worth mentioning however, especially if they affect gameplay. If a Qualified mapset accumulates a significant number of minor issues, or if there is one or more major / unrankable issues, the mapset should be disqualified so that fixes and improvements can be made before attempting requalification.

If you’re unsure on the nature of a potential problem, ask for other opinions or review previous mod posts to make sure the “issue” presented isn’t something done intentionally by the mapper - if so, it will likely have been discussed already. If there has been no prior discussion, feel free to open one as if you were modding the map normally. If you feel the issues discovered should prevent the mapset from being ranked, report it in this thread with a link to your mod post and a brief outline of your concerns.

Note that it is the community’s responsibility ALONE to report issues with qualified beatmaps. The Quality Assurance Team will NOT actively check and disqualify mapsets unless prompted to do so.



Previous version (prior 15.8.2016)

Behaviour and Conduct

  • The goal of modding is to help a mapper improve their work so that it can be pushed towards Ranked status if the mapper chooses to do so. If you're not interested in helping people, steer clear of the discussion to avoid hurting them.
  • When modding, consider who the post is directed at, what you aim to achieve by posting and what response you expect to receive. This will ensure your best intentions are conveyed and your post is easy to understand.
    • Don’t shy away from new mappers and modders - these people are the ones who can benefit the most from your input! Be patient, understanding, and provide as much explanation as possible so that they can learn and improve more quickly
    • If you’re new yourself, don’t be afraid to say so! This will allow more experienced community members to point you in the right direction. Everyone was new and in your position once!
  • Treat others as you wish to be treated. People are more receptive to kind, helpful suggestions than hostile ones. Try to understand others’ point-of-view rather than attack it - nobody likes to feel worthless, incompetent or stupid. If you are a masochist, assume that all others are not.
  • If you wish to comment on or discuss a beatmap, go to that beatmap’s thread - not social media outlets, or the Disqus comments section (if the map is Qualified), as it is unlikely your concerns will be heard by anyone with the power to address them appropriately.
  • Personal attacks, hateful comments, misplaced joking, derailing the thread and general drama-initiation are not acceptable in any form and will not be tolerated.

Making a Mod Post

So you downloaded a map and you've thought of some things you aren't happy with - now's the time to put your thoughts to words and help improve the map. But how can you get the mapper to see your point of view, test your suggestions and give you feedback? After all, no-one likes feeling that their time has been wasted.
  • Before modding, ensure your intentions are good and you are focused on the task at hand. No-one likes to receive a rude or lazy mod.
  • When making suggestions, try to differentiate between what is intersubjectively / objectively bad or wrong, and what you simply dislike on a personal level. All types of suggestion are fine as long as they are put forward accordingly.
    • Objective Issues - Prohibited by rulesets and must be fixed.
    • Intersubjective Issues - Not prohibited by rulesets, but are agreed upon as being “wrong” by a majority of people. Should be fixed in most cases unless there are opposing intersubjective arguments with equal size, or if the mapper can exhaustively explain why they feel it is acceptable
    • Subjective Issues - Something that you believe or think on a personal level. Might become intersubjective if many people agree with it.
  • Unless the concept behind a beatmap is fundamentally flawed from the start, modding should aim to improve the map in it’s current design - not force your own style upon it. If you truly believe the map has too many significant issues to address individually, try to give a general statement of why this is the case and what direction you think the map should go in to get back on track.
  • When pointing out issues, consider exactly what it is about the particular "thing" you dislike. Then, try to offer a potential solution or improvement and consider exactly how that suggestion will improve the map.
  • Suggestions themselves should ideally consist of four main parts, though based on the experience of the mapper and/or your personal relationship to them, you may want to be more lenient:
    1. A statement of the issue itself and where it can be found - including a timestamp is a huge help so that the mapper can find the part in question quickly.
    2. A brief explanation of why this causes a problem - this is essential in convincing a mapper to even consider your suggestion. Mappers are much more receptive to criticism and change when it's accompanied by clear, understandable and valid reasoning.
    3. One or more alternative suggestions, accompanied by explanations of how they address the problem(s) - much like the above, explanation is key here. Even if you can convince the mapper that their current work can be improved, what makes your suggestion better than theirs, or anyone else's?
    4. The wording (or even language) used should take the mapper into consideration. Are they a fluent English speaker? If not, stick to simple and easy-to-understand language. If you both speak the same language, by all means write in that language. If necessary, support your suggestions with screenshots, illustrations, or even short video clips to help get your point across.
  • Inspect each “issue” thoroughly, trying multiple suggestions to see which work best - The more help you can offer the mapper, the better.

Responding to a Mod

Someone just posted some suggestions on your map, great! - but it doesn't end there. For the record, it's necessary to give a proper response for two major reasons. Firstly, so that future mods can be tailored more specifically to your concept or style, resulting in fewer unhelpful suggestions. Secondly, just as a mod post helps you to improve your mapping ability, providing a detailed mod response helps the modder improve their modding ability, meaning they gain experience and can provide more helpful and detailed mods in the future. You never know who you may need to ask for a mod next time around!
  • Treat all suggestions as valid and equally important until you have thoroughly inspected and tested them - even minor stylistic changes or alternative viewpoints can help improve the quality of a beatmap
  • As with making a mod post, be sure to explain yourself as much as possible. State what you changed, and if you didn’t accept the suggestion for some reason, explain why and what you did instead.
  • When declining a suggestion, remain calm and professional, say what needs to be said in order to explain yourself and leave it at that. No matter how impolite, confusing or unhelpful the suggestion was, getting angry and responding with hostility, sarcasm, etc. will not help the situation.
  • BNs and QATs will review previous mods before placing any icons and may want to initiate or revisit discussions during their checks. Any assistance you can provide as to why you did or didn’t do something takes very little effort, and could be a huge help to all parties later on.

Further Exchange and Discussion

Sometimes, a single mod and response isn't enough to bring all parties to agreement, or fully resolve an issue. Perhaps the mapper doesn't agree with a suggestion, and the modder isn't satisfied with their response. Alternatively, both parties might agree that although one option is better, it isn't the best option and could still be improved further with additional input. Continued feedback is the best way to improve a beatmap, so get people involved and talking to get as many different ideas, or see things from as many points of view as necessary.
  • If you’re unsure about something, ask the person in question to explain what they meant. They should be more than willing to explain things to you in more detail.
  • Still can’t reach an agreement? Ask someone with more experience, such as a BN or QAT. Remember they are busy people, however!
    Should you realise there's a more suitable alternative to something you originally suggested, don't be afraid to put your pride aside - sometimes being wrong can be far more valuable than being right.
  • There is no such things as a "wrong" opinion - it's up to the mapper and modders to come to an agreement in a civil manner - try to understand alternative points of view rather than attack them, as you never know when it might be useful in the future.
  • If you can't explain something through logic, you will not be able to explain it to them through violence either. Rather than continue a discussion that isn’t progressing, walk away and try again with the next modder/mapper.
  • When things look to be getting out of hand, or of the discussion is struggling to stay on topic, call a moderator - don't contribute to the problem by continuing to post.
[/list]

Qualified Mapsets

The Qualified section allows mapsets to receive any final suggestions for change or improvement before reaching Ranked status. When modding a Qualified map, everything you consider “not minor” should always be mentioned - minor issues are also worth mentioning however, especially if they affect gameplay. If a Qualified mapset accumulates a significant number of minor issues, or if there is one or more major / unrankable issues, the mapset should be disqualified so that fixes and improvements can be made before attempting requalification.

If you’re unsure on the nature of a potential problem, ask for other opinions or review previous mod posts to make sure the “issue” presented isn’t something done intentionally by the mapper - if so, it will likely have been discussed already. If there has been no prior discussion, feel free to open one as if you were modding the map normally. If you feel the issues discovered should prevent the mapset from being ranked, report it in this thread with a link to your mod post and a brief outline of your concerns.

Note that it is the community’s responsibility ALONE to report issues with qualified beatmaps. The Quality Assurance Team will NOT actively check and disqualify mapsets unless prompted to do so.
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Combo Commander
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Awesome work! Hope that this post explains a lot of things and misconceptions.
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Spinner Sage
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Quote:
When making suggestions, try to differentiate between what is intersubjectively or objectively bad or wrong, and what you simply dislike on a personal level.


I don't think subjective opinions are necessarily bad, and disliking something personally can still have merit - since I think most people agree that getting maps to the point where they're played because they're fun/challenging, and not unfair/otherwise is the end goal. I feel like this bullet point is a little bit better addressed in the main parts of the suggestion list you have. Imo it essentially boils down to, consider your mod to be a dialogue to the other mapper. If it's simply "move x to y" the whole time, or "you missed a note here", there might not be much need for elaboration, but when explaining patterns and expressing dislike, whether subjective or objective, it should be on the modder's side of the field to make sure the mapper understands their point of view.

Quote:
Start with small changes to preserve the existing concept of the beatmap. Try more significant changes only if necessary.

I think this is much less a code of conduct thing, but a general modding guideline? Not sure how necessary this is.

Like, if this is a code of conduct, a lot of that section I feel like can be condensed with the "responding to a mod" section, because in the end, it's everyone wanting their maps to be better assuming the code of conduct is followed, and a "treat others the way you want to be treated" kinda comes into play i think.

========================

I'm actually the most confused about giving kudosu. Mostly to BN checks, and repeated mods, what's the policy on that - I've never really seen any real set in stone thing other than "give kudosu to mods you found helpful, even if you didn't apply any changes to your map"

Also, with modding v2, potential changes to the kudosu system or something may be happening as well?

========================

good guidelines though, based off of literally "common sense. think about what others are thinking. don't be a diq"
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Rhythm Incarnate
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Quote:
BNs and QATs will review previous mods before placing any icons and may want to initiate or revisit discussions during their checks. Any assistance you can provide as to why you did or didn’t do something takes very little effort, and could be a huge help to all parties later on.


Would like to see more explanation on this point though - so basically we mod mods before iconing the mapset? How will this system work? Do we have to rate the mod with some new kind of system or actually go out and contact the modders? A bit too vague in it's current state.

Also, perhaps this should be up to the mapper. The maximum BNs and QATs can help other modders, is mostly with their attitude - I think the mapper should also take part in deciding on how helpful the mod / the attitude was. It's the mappers' work the modders are improving them after all, and not us - we don't have the direct connection between them.

Rest looks generally cool to me, as you said 'common sense' can be applied to most points anyways!
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Rhythm Incarnate
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Loctav wrote:
If you are a masochist, assume that all others are not.


Awesome! Hopefully this will avoid those salty behaviours amongst mappers and modders when a beatmap is qualified and how their opinions are treated.

The guide is really organized but I think "Making a Post" could be summarized with simple questions and answers instead of that making a manual of how to post your opinion. What I mean is that something like: what's bad for you?, why? and how/what would be better? could be more than enough in my opinion.

Looking forward to see this applied! Good job to Mr. JBHyperion! Currently working as a Professional Chair Thrower. What a tiring job! o:
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osu! Alumni
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Neat stuff!

The only thing I'm worried about is that this code suggests writing super huge paragraphs as mods, while keeping it short and simple is better 99% of the time in reality. Not every point in a mod needs those four steps, especially when modding experienced mappers' maps, it's better to keep it as one sentence unless it's a complicated issue.

Daikyi wrote:
Quote:
When making suggestions, try to differentiate between what is intersubjectively or objectively bad or wrong, and what you simply dislike on a personal level.


I don't think subjective opinions are necessarily bad...

Nobody said that, it's just that you make it clear if your suggestion is very subjective or not (this is especially important when modding inexperienced mappers' maps).

Daikyi wrote:
I'm actually the most confused about giving kudosu. Mostly to BN checks, and repeated mods, what's the policy on that - I've never really seen any real set in stone thing other than "give kudosu to mods you found helpful, even if you didn't apply any changes to your map"

Also, with modding v2, potential changes to the kudosu system or something may be happening as well?

I don't really get the term 'BN check', I mean, it's a normal mod isn't it why wouldn't it get kudosu? If the BN just ranks your map without modding then it's not a mod and doesn't get a kudosu. Rechecks / repeated mods don't get kudosu unless the map changed drastically (aka remap) and there is some months of time in between.
I have no idea what will happen to kudosu with modding v2 but it can't stay as it is simply because we won't be posting actual mod posts anymore (only single suggestions).

appleeaterx wrote:
things

You are already supposed to skim through the mods a mapset has got and see if anything's not been applied. By doing that you get an overview of how the communication of the mapper and the modders has been. I don't think there is anything more behind this.
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Rhythm Incarnate
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Nice ^^! I agree with that part to don't be so rude with the mapper plus avoiding the jokes while modding.I know modding is a bit boring and that's why mostly of modders (some of them let's say) are getting something to have some fun and also to hurt the mapper in my opinion.Even if you are getting bored,still you have to be polite while modding and also addresing the issues without jokes or anything hurtful so the mapper will get it what he/she have to fix.Looking forward on what will going on! :)
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Spinner Sage
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Quote:
Nobody said that, it's just that you make it clear if your suggestion is very subjective or not (this is especially important when modding inexperienced mappers' maps).


Exactly, I think this can be clarified a tiny bit in the code, since it's a tiny bit ambiguous imo right now

Quote:
things about kudosu

ty for clarification lol, i guess common sense stuff
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Rhythm Incarnate
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Hey!

Gave the thread a quick read and it seems interesting and makes things much more clear and allows for constructive criticism to be actually supported and set in stone.
Just a small suggestion though, it was said that QATs from now on will only be helping to DQ maps through the community's reports. Maybe add a section instructing on how to act based on already-qualified maps (e.g. make sure that the issue presented isn't something intentional by the mapper/if it is intentional and unrankable, explain what point in the ranking criteria disallows it) so it makes these cases much clearer to judge. After all, not many people enjoy when the thread of a more complex mapping style is filled with "I can't read this, please DQ" etc.

When possible I'll try to give a few more suggestions, but for now this should be all
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Quality Assurance Team
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Loctav wrote:
Unless the concept behind a beatmap is fundamentally flawed from the start, modding should aim to improve the map in it’s current design - not force your own style upon it.


what are modders supposed to say about a map that is fundamentally flawed? the "making a mod post" section assumes the map is acceptable, so i don't think modders will understand how to criticize fundamental issues without appearing to force their preferences
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Quality Assurance Team
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Writing huge paragraphs as mods should only be necessary if that much information is required to understand your point. I found it in most situations more appropriate to get to your point in as little words as possible to remain understandable. Oftentimes only one convincing argument is needed instead of a barrage of a lot small ones / huge chunks of explanation.
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Spinner Sage
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Loctav wrote:
Treat others as you wish to be treated.

what if I deserve to be treated like shit

Quote:
Unless the concept behind a beatmap is fundamentally flawed from the start, modding should aim to improve the map in it’s current design - not force your own style upon it.

if this is the case, then concepts should be stated explicitly when submitted the map. there are quite a few ways to approach map making, and the best way to tell another player what you're aiming for it to just outright tell them.
an example: I make a map filled with jackhammers that are following a gated synth line in the background, with minimal layering otherwise. I don't tell players this, and players are upset that I'm not using trills or jumpstream.

Quote:
When making suggestions, try to differentiate between what is intersubjectively or objectively bad or wrong, and what you simply dislike on a personal level.

players from the stepmania community will have "subjectivity" that is different when compared to players from the o2jam community and the bms community.
an example: o2jam charts tend to be very heavy on holds that are usually somewhat arbitrary when taking the song into account. sm charts tend to have very short holds that accent certain sounds in the song. bms charts tend to LAYER EVERYTHING HARD.

Quote:
The wording (or even language) used should take the mapper into consideration.[/b] Are they a fluent English speaker? If not, stick to simple and easy-to-understand language. If you both speak the same language, by all means write in that language. If necessary, support your suggestions with screenshots, illustrations, or even short video clips to help get your point across.

has anyone attempted to make a thread showcasing patterns and the names for those patterns?

Quote:
Start with small changes to preserve the existing concept of the beatmap. Try more significant changes only if necessary.

small changes will never fix a map that's inherently flawed. imo, the best way to approach this is to present a large number of changes, and it is up to the mapper to make/not make the changes.
an example: I present two changes to a map. the mapper decides to make the first change, but gives me a reason why he would not like to make the second change.


with such a large amount of players, there will always be drama when it comes to critiquing maps. but this is a good step in the right direction to minimize drama.
retired player
but I still make shit content
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Rhythm Incarnate
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appleeaterx wrote:
Quote:
BNs and QATs will review previous mods before placing any icons and may want to initiate or revisit discussions during their checks. Any assistance you can provide as to why you did or didn’t do something takes very little effort, and could be a huge help to all parties later on.


Would like to see more explanation on this point though - so basically we mod mods before iconing the mapset? How will this system work? Do we have to rate the mod with some new kind of system or actually go out and contact the modders? A bit too vague in it's current state.


I always check every mod, before modding a map D:.

anyways seems good, this reminds me of this thread: t/151677
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Rhythm Incarnate
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Natsu wrote:
I always check every mod, before modding a map D:.

anyways seems good, this reminds me of this thread: t/151677


This wasn't completely what I meant tho; checking the map thread is already a thing, yes.
I was more referring to the vague messages sent in Discord & #modhelp about 'rating mods' and I wanted to know if that's actually going to be a thing :/
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Rhythm Incarnate
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Quote:
The goal of modding is to help a mapper improve their work so that it can achieve Ranked status. If you're not interested in helping people, steer clear of the discussion to avoid hurting them.

I believe this is wrong/incomplete.
It's not solely about improving a specific work of a mapper with the exclusive purpose of pushing the map towards ranking.
Modding happens to give mappers feedback so they can reflect their work under various aspects.
This is not only good for improving a specific map but to improve the mapper's awareness and expertise on the matter which affects his future modding/mapping work in a positive way regardless of what happens to that specific map in the end.

tl;dr: Mods on maps that are not going to be ranked are valuable.

I'd suggest removing the part about Ranked Status or altering the wording because right now it sounds like it's not worthwhile to mod a map that is unlikely to get ranked.
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