1. osu! forums
  2. osu!
  3. Gameplay & Rankings
posted
from constant 0.4ms to 2.2ms constant, didn't temper with anything, just happen suddenly
posted
Make sure your framerate limit is set to unlimited (gameplay), I guess? 2.2ms is still very low and will not affect your performance in any way, though.
posted
blame peppy
posted
Look at task manager and see if anything has a lot of disk usage. That tends to make osu stutter and ruin frame rates.
posted

Wishes wrote:

Make sure your framerate limit is set to unlimited (gameplay), I guess? 2.2ms is still very low and will not affect your performance in any way, though.
It literally directly adds exactly the amount (2.2ms) [on average] of variability to your keypresses being registered and raises your UR ._.
posted

Momi wrote:

Wishes wrote:

Make sure your framerate limit is set to unlimited (gameplay), I guess? 2.2ms is still very low and will not affect your performance in any way, though.
It literally directly adds exactly the amount (2.2ms) [on average] of variability to your keypresses being registered and raises your UR ._.
No actually it is 2.2ms at maximum and hence 1.1ms on average. Which is a very small time and not significant.
posted

Wishes wrote:

No actually it is 2.2ms at maximum and hence 1.1ms on average. Which is a very small time and not significant.
A couple of ms here and there is insignificant only until you start treating it like it's insignificant.

Then it starts to add up everywhere because you haven't been paying attention to minimizing your latency, and that's how you end up running a 60hz monitor in triple buffered vsync mode, with 3 additional frames of scaler latency and 32ms grey to grey transitions, in windowed mode, and things end up being displayed on your screen 180ms+ behind when they actually happened. This is a contrived but fully possible example where I'm not even mentioning keyboard/tablet/mouse/driver/USB hub/reshade+etc dll hook postprocessing/router bufferbloat latency, and most cases that kind of added lag won't be so severe, but if you care about gaming you shouldn't ignore latency fixes of "only" a few ms here and there, because every time you ignore that kind of thing is cumulative.

Here's a link to an old anandtech article that covers some of the basic sources of i/o chain latency (there are more that it doesn't touch on): https://www.anandtech.com/show/2803/7
posted
Most articles measure input lag from the time you click and button and the time the response appears on the screen, but since in this game you don't really have to react to what is happening on the screen as fast as you can (unless you are trying to play with an AR that is too high for you), in this game, the graphical delay is not really important, just the time between the button press and the game detecting it.

Also, it is important to distinguish between sources of constant lag and sources of random input lag.

Constant lag is not important as long as the player is used to it. If a player keeps using a setup with constant lag, they will automatically adjust to the point where they don't even notice it is there and it won't have negative effects on their performance.

Random lag has more detrimental effects on performance, since the player can't adjust to it.

As long as the BPM of a song is not perfectly synced with the frametime you are playing, and the fps is perfectly constant, the delay caused by frame time each hit is a random variable, following closely an uniform distribution, with an average latency equal to frametime/2, and a standard deviation equal to the frametime/sqrt(12) (for example, if a player has 0ms average hit error and 70 UR on a certain play with very high fps, copying their exact inputs but with a setup that uses 200fps and is the same in all other aspects, it would get around 2.5ms average hit error and 71.47 UR; if the original play was less accurate, the effect would be even smaller, for example, with 5ms average error and 200UR, lowering to 200fps would give you around 7.5ms average error and 200.52 UR). The player can adjust to the average lag caused by long frametime, but the increase in UR can't be adjusted to, so the accuracy achieved in a play is slightly affected negatively, in average.

Stuttering frames (detected in the game client by those squares showing up next to the fps display) with high average fps have a much worse effect on performance than a constant fps that is not high.
Please sign in to reply.