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posted
Just curious, but are there any pros out there that use Cherry MX Blue key switches? I personally find it really hard to singletap fast maps with blue key switches due to its relatively low sensitivity.
posted
People often say that blue switches are bad for osu! But I've never tried to play with them so I can't judge. The most popular for osu! are red and brown.
posted
Maybe
posted
I've tried playing with them and didn't really enjoy it. I think it's down to the reset time of the slider (the thing that actually clicks), basically there is some slop in the system that something like a brown or red doesn't have.
posted
Most of all they are loud and as you'll be kind of smashing your keys while playing it is often perceived as very annoying by your fellow humans.
There's also some technical aspect in the actuation of the key:

As you can see there's that white mobile part. Other common Cherry MX keys used for osu! (red, brown, black) don't have this (or rather it is not mobile).
As the actuation is dependent on how much force is transmitted to that mobile part rather than how far you pressed the key down, MX blues can be regarded less consistent ever so slightly.
posted
Gayzmcgee and Cookiezi (around the 2010-2013 era) played blues. So it's really about just practice.
posted
I don't think so, because I think the tactile bump makes it harder to learn to acc. I think linear switches are better.

Being good at acc in osu means that your brain has learned to sync some form of "hand event" precisely with with the beats as you hear them in your ears (an "ear event"). When I play osu!, the "hand event" that my brain tries to sync to the beat is when my finger bottoms out on the key. Or if I'm just listening to the music and trying to tap along on the table, the "hand event" that my brain tries to sync is the moment I feel my finger touching the table.

If you use tactile keys, however, there are two distinct "hand events" that your brain could potentially learn to sync to the music. You could sync the moment you feel the tactile event, or the moment you bottom out on the key. This could potentially complicate the learning process. Let's say you're trying to sync the bottom-out feeling to the music. In that case, not only do you need to sync the feeling of bottoming out with the music, you also need to not sync the feeling of the tactile event to the music. It's kinda like trying play drums with nunchakus.

Or I could be wrong. Maybe it doesn't matter at all and your brain learns accuracy just as fast with tactile keys as with linear keys.
posted
I have use blue switch for couple years now because it's cheap. my single tap below 200bpm faster than that can replace with alternating and my stream even worst , so you can say blue switches suck.
posted
Yes
posted

Mio Winter wrote:

I don't think so, because I think the tactile bump makes it harder to learn to acc. I think linear switches are better.

Being good at acc in osu means that your brain has learned to sync some form of "hand event" precisely with with the beats as you hear them in your ears (an "ear event"). When I play osu!, the "hand event" that my brain tries to sync to the beat is when my finger bottoms out on the key. Or if I'm just listening to the music and trying to tap along on the table, the "hand event" that my brain tries to sync is the moment I feel my finger touching the table.

If you use tactile keys, however, there are two distinct "hand events" that your brain could potentially learn to sync to the music. You could sync the moment you feel the tactile event, or the moment you bottom out on the key. This could potentially complicate the learning process. Let's say you're trying to sync the bottom-out feeling to the music. In that case, not only do you need to sync the feeling of bottoming out with the music, you also need to not sync the feeling of the tactile event to the music. It's kinda like trying play drums with nunchakus.

Or I could be wrong. Maybe it doesn't matter at all and your brain learns accuracy just as fast with tactile keys as with linear keys.
I'd argue that feeling the actuation point is good for accuracy as there's consistent feedback on the actuation.
On linear switches the speed the key travels down has an immediate effect on the actuation point but the only feedback you get is when you bottomed the key out. Personally I had a good experience learning accuracy with browns but then again, I'm not Epiphany.
posted

Endaris wrote:

Mio Winter wrote:

I don't think so, because I think the tactile bump makes it harder to learn to acc. I think linear switches are better.

Being good at acc in osu means that your brain has learned to sync some form of "hand event" precisely with with the beats as you hear them in your ears (an "ear event"). When I play osu!, the "hand event" that my brain tries to sync to the beat is when my finger bottoms out on the key. Or if I'm just listening to the music and trying to tap along on the table, the "hand event" that my brain tries to sync is the moment I feel my finger touching the table.

If you use tactile keys, however, there are two distinct "hand events" that your brain could potentially learn to sync to the music. You could sync the moment you feel the tactile event, or the moment you bottom out on the key. This could potentially complicate the learning process. Let's say you're trying to sync the bottom-out feeling to the music. In that case, not only do you need to sync the feeling of bottoming out with the music, you also need to not sync the feeling of the tactile event to the music. It's kinda like trying play drums with nunchakus.

Or I could be wrong. Maybe it doesn't matter at all and your brain learns accuracy just as fast with tactile keys as with linear keys.
I'd argue that feeling the actuation point is good for accuracy as there's consistent feedback on the actuation.
On linear switches the speed the key travels down has an immediate effect on the actuation point but the only feedback you get is when you bottomed the key out. Personally I had a good experience learning accuracy with browns but then again, I'm not Epiphany.
Which is why I prefer linear keys with a low actuation point. I haven't gotten to try it yet, because the keyboard hasn't arrived, but I'm planning to add O-rings up to my actuation point, so that I bottom out very close to the actuation point.
posted
In other news, acquaint yourself with this site and learn how to solder, program and ultimately build your own keypad. It's a nice way to test out different switches and figure out different quirks about your playstyle, indirectly.
posted
I have used both, and am able to say that for Osu!, the difference is minor yet noticable. I was able to stream ~20bpm faster, but that didnt mean much as with the blues i was already able to stream about 190. If you are asking which key to get first, red. If you already have a blue keyboard and are thinking about paying for another one with red, dont. The money is worth clicking faster
posted
Dude I'm playing with blue switches and I dont recomend that the single taping is to hard and im not goinh to talk about the streams.
posted
Blue switches are fine for osu but please don't necro
posted

masky wrote:

Just curious, but are there any pros out there that use Cherry MX Blue key switches? I personally find it really hard to singletap fast maps with blue key switches due to its relatively low sensitivity.
they are good for breaking your fingers when trying to stream :P
posted
Since this already necro'd twice over lemme just say I have blue switches and I'm doing fine. They are a little heavy sure but you get used to it.

However, I would only recommend if you're ok with LOUD NOISES
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