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posted
I have been very uncomfortable with my pen for the whole time I've used it, and am curious as to how exactly it works to know what parts of it I can destroy without stopping it from functioning.



I've already removed the button from my pen which made it impossible for me to grip it without one of my fingers being irritated by the button's presence and depressability. The huge gap is also annoying to deal with so I am wondering whether or not I can fill that space in with melted plastic or something similar. Would filling in that space with plastic cause the circuit board there to malfunction? I don't care as to whether or not the button would ever be functional again, just if it would activate all the time or something, though I suspect not since they seem to be pressure activated.

The next part I am curious about is how the pen transmits to the tablet. As far as I know I don't need to ever replace a battery, so is it the nib? Is the nib magnetic or something? Could I cut the pen in half and still have it be functional? If it is the nib, could I theoretically make my own pen and just use a wacom pen nib?



Picture of whole pen just in case there was any question as to what pen it was. Is there some sort of battery in the silver end of the pen? Is it necessary to function?

Thanks for any answers.
posted
Use the eraser tip if you hate touching the buttons. That's what I did and it works perfectly the same.
posted

Arthraxium wrote:

Use the eraser tip if you hate touching the buttons. That's what I did and it works perfectly the same.
The supposed eraser tip doesn't track for me. Could it be that I'm using the wrong driver version? I am using the supposed no input lag driver.
posted
It should track if you installed one of the recent drivers.
It might not work with Windows XP, as far as I know.
posted

Arthraxium wrote:

It should track if you installed one of the recent drivers.
It might not work with Windows XP, as far as I know.
I also have some issue with the tablet where it won't track at all unless I have windows ink enabled and it also doesn't work in mouse mode. So my issue could be related to that instead of a driver issue. I've looked around and posted before about the windows ink issue but haven't had any solutions.
posted
Try installing your setup (tablet drivers, etc) on another PC. If it works differently than yours, it might be your PC's problem.
posted
The model pen that OP is using does not have an eraser end to it.

_Asop wrote:

am curious as to how exactly it works
Wacom Tablets use electromagnetic coils beneath the tablet surface to track the pen's location. Wikipedia describes this under the passive tablet section, Basically these coils power a small chip inside the pen which then returns a signal to the coils allowing the tablet to find the current location. No batteries are included in this process.

_Asop wrote:

I am wondering whether or not I can fill that space in with melted plastic
The pen should work assuming you are using a non-conductive plastic to fill the buttons, however, I cannot suggest it. (Edit: I would also be concerned that the temperature of the melted plastic might damage the circuit board or components) If the buttons are stuck in an "on" position you can disable the buttons in the driver software. I personally would start by covering the hole with a piece of plastic packaging tape, which might be a less destructive fix, if that did not work, I would try using some moldable plastic pellets to try and cover the hole.
posted

sangu wrote:

The model pen that OP is using does not have an eraser end to it.

_Asop wrote:

am curious as to how exactly it works
Wacom Tablets use electromagnetic coils beneath the tablet surface to track the pen's location. Wikipedia describes this under the passive tablet section, Basically these coils power a small chip inside the pen which then returns a signal to the coils allowing the tablet to find the current location. No batteries are included in this process.

_Asop wrote:

I am wondering whether or not I can fill that space in with melted plastic
The pen should work assuming you are using a non-conductive plastic to fill the buttons, however, I cannot suggest it. (Edit: I would also be concerned that the temperature of the melted plastic might damage the circuit board or components) If the buttons are stuck in an "on" position you can disable the buttons in the driver software. I personally would start by covering the hole with a piece of plastic packaging tape, which might be a less destructive fix, if that did not work, I would try using some moldable plastic pellets to try and cover the hole.
Thanks for the response. So what is the purpose of the nib? Is it necessary for tracking? What part of the pen specifically is corresponding to the cursor?
posted
The nib is not necessary for tracking. The nib only supplies something to rub on the tablet surface and something to press the button inside the pen. It is made of a softer plastic than the tablet surface, so that when rubbed, the softer material is ground away, protecting the surface of the tablet.

The cursor on screen corresponds to the end of the pen, just inside where the nib is attached.
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