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posted
So apparently Das Keyboard is starting their own lineup of gaming peripherals, with their own brand of Cherry MX knockoffs?


They're calling them Alpha-Zulu Olive (MX Red equivalent), and Alpha-Zulu Mustard (MX Brown equivalent).
and here's their promo site

They're even advertising that their Mustard switches are optimized for osu!. I wonder who's manufacturing them (EDIT: confirmed Greetech), and how they compare to Cherry or Gateron.
at least they look better than the Razer switches on-paper, hue
Any thoughts?
posted
https://www.reddit.com/r/MechanicalKeyb ... of_gaming/

Greentech will have their hand on them.
I will wait for more technical informations and review on lifehacker or /r/MechanicalKeyboards about them.
IMO it might end up like with Razer shit-switches. Who knows.

Maybe ZennyWikia already have more info.
@Zenny-chan, i summon you to give us some word!
posted
Mechs are inferior to optical. I see no difference between this and Razer's Kailh switches other than better QC control. They don't measure denounce latencies or reliability over time or operating force over actuation graphs.
posted

ZenithPhantasm wrote:

Mechs are inferior to optical.
As expected. What would we ever do without you, Zenny?
posted

CuboidBeats wrote:

ZenithPhantasm wrote:

Mechs are inferior to optical.
As expected. What would we ever do without you, Zenny?
You would be victims of Razer's marketing ploys.
posted
for better accuracy, give me a switch that activates when bottomed out so that it's not necessary to maintain constant speed and force with each keypress.
for better speed and stamina, give me a shorter switck so that less movement is required to repeatedly tap.

when will they make such a switch hm?
posted

Momiji wrote:

for better accuracy, give me a switch that activates when bottomed out so that it's not necessary to maintain constant speed and force with each keypress.
Rubberdome/Topre+Oring xDDDD
posted

ZenithPhantasm wrote:

Mechs are inferior to optical. I see no difference between this and Razer's Kailh switches other than better QC control. They don't measure denounce latencies or reliability over time or operating force over actuation graphs.
But.. But.. Here's my take on it. I've played with tripwire sensors with Arduino before:

There's 2 pins to process data from. Per switch. At least judging from the sketches.

Which makes it a pain to hand-wire the circuits properly, plus the traditional electrical matrix would essentially be rendered useless. Which means Atmel or ARM controllers with physically more I/O pins, which the electrical matrix is supposed to reduce the quantity of. Meaning more expensive microcontrollers must be implemented. This also means more complicated PCB layout.

Not only that, but it's an optical sensor. Having learned capacitance from basic high school physics, you're dealing with extremely low voltages. Meaning more sensitive controllers must be used. Those usually don't come cheap either (at least in bulk). Don't even get me started on how much sensors cost.

Meaning more expensive electronics overall. Which only early adopters are only willing to buy.

TL;DR - Optical switches have reduced flexibility in terms of electrical layouts, compared to mechs. If you can't DIY your own solution without tearing your own head off, no one is going to adopt this. /s

There's a reason why Omron and Honeywell are still in business, ya?


P.S. -> If there's an affiliate link where I can buy these switches raw I would highly appreciate that. I, at least, want to confirm or deny Zenny's statements
posted
Its certainly less practical but theoretically it is better.
posted

ZenithPhantasm wrote:

Its certainly less practical but theoretically it is better.
Hey, at least they're working on optical computing as well. That should be a boon for you :)

Good luck translating photons into logic (Don't confuse this with optical cables and data transfer; Were talking CPU logic based on light, not electricity)
posted

The Gambler wrote:

ZenithPhantasm wrote:

Its certainly less practical but theoretically it is better.
Hey, at least they're working on optical computing as well. That should be a boon for you :)

Good luck translating photons into logic (Don't confuse this with optical cables and data transfer; Were talking CPU logic based on light, not electricity)
You would need an all optical computer for it to have any benefit whatsoever.
Dont see it in forseeable future.
posted
I'll one-up this optical tomfoolery:

Hall effect switches need no LED at all (meaning no LED burnout). Just the sensor that changes voltage due to changing magnetic fields. Function-wise, it does the same thing

THIS IS OBVIOUSLY SUPPOSED TO START A DESKTHORITY WAR BUT HEY, I GUESS NO ONE ACTUALLY DID THEIR HOMEWORK.
posted
"over 30 billion keypresses" LOL
posted
Hall sensors only win in durability. They're not as precise and require constant recalibration.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hall_effe ... advantages
posted
As long as the production has good quality control, I guess it should be fine. Gateron have done it as well.
posted
good lord that keyboard design
just why
posted

Noobsicle wrote:

good lord that keyboard design
just why
That's why you AutoCAD your own plates. So you wouldn't have to buy one.
posted
Honestly, I don't really care about the keyboard itself... I'm just hoping that the switches themselves are actually good for osu!. I have no problem about ordering two switches on Ebay and shoving them into one of the keyboards I already own.
posted
I had to do a doubletake when I saw them list osu! as part of their marketing for the switches.

Makes me wonder how many tablets and mechanical keyboards this game has sold :shock:

I honestly doubt that the switches would be anything "better" than what we have now, but can't know for sure until they are released.
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