1. osu! forums
  2. osu!
  3. Development
  4. Ranking Criteria
  5. Finalized/Denied Amendments
show more
posted
Yousei Teikoku whyyy :cry:

I can't think of any other examples of 'official' group translations, which leaves us just with eccentric Yousei Teikoku to base this ruling on. Which really just makes it an edge case. I think official group translations should be disregarded except in the cases where the group is literally called only by that name. Basically just use whatever is listed on the song.

If anyone can pull more examples to better compile this rule that'd be great.
posted
Not exactly the same case, but related:
電気式華憐音楽集団 <- proper name
I really don't want to see Denkishikikarenongakushuudan as the romanized artist, and rather use the shortened Denkare which has been used by mappers so far.

Same singer as Yousei Teikoku btw, go figure :roll:
posted
Might have to just make it a case-by-case basis due to it not being anywhere near common, and not being totally black and white. With the addendum that if someone has mapped that artist before, you should use their example so the maps by said artist group correctly.
posted
The problem I see with Hepburn romanisation would be having to use "ō" in the non-unicode field. tangorin's style of romanisation avoids this and I believe it is actually closer to osu!'s style of romanisation than Hepburn, but I don't know what it's called.

In a more specific example of HujuniseikouyuuP, I believe there is reason to start romanising it as FujuniseikouyuuP instead. However, this would imply ふじゅに (fujuni) as opposed to ふじゅんい (fujun'i), so there is still the question of we should use apostrophes in these situations, like with ren'ai. Then there's capitalisation. Is it wrong to use FujunIseiKouyuuP to denote the separate parts of the name? And capitalisation issues carry over to many other cases.
posted

SapphireGhost wrote:

The problem I see with Hepburn romanisation would be having to use "ō" in the non-unicode field. tangorin's style of romanisation avoids this and I believe it is actually closer to osu!'s style of romanisation than Hepburn, but I don't know what it's called.

In a more specific example of HujuniseikouyuuP, I believe there is reason to start romanising it as FujuniseikouyuuP instead. However, this would imply ふじゅに (fujuni) as opposed to ふじゅんい (fujun'i), so there is still the question of we should use apostrophes in these situations, like with ren'ai. Then there's capitalisation. Is it wrong to use FujunIseiKouyuuP to denote the separate parts of the name? And capitalization issues carry over to many other cases.
Using ō causes all kinds of problems, like confusing oo and ou, nevermind the fact that osu's systems don't like it. Long and extended vowels should always be written out.

For FujuniseikouyuuP, I believe it got romanized into Hu just because typing 'hu' into the IME puts out ふ [fu] as there is no 'hu'. 不純異性交遊 is read FU.

As for apostrophes. This comes down to personal preference I guess? I mean I see nothing wrong with using them, and they serve an actual purpose, but they aren't entirely vital to reading or transliterating. I guess in the Example Fujun'iseikouyuuP I would vote in favor of using them, as it helps break up very long names. On intercapping long names; I've never actually seen anyone do that. I wouldn't be opposed to it, but like I said I've never seen anyone use intercaps in romanization.
posted
Chinese, Japanese and Korean titles must be romanised and not translated unless a translated title is officially provided. Foreign words in titles should be romanised to the original language instead.
changed to:

Metadata originally from a non-Latin alphabet language must be romanized using an accepted system deemed as standard for that language (such as Hepburn for Japanese). In cases where the exact system to use for romanization is uncertain, existing ranked maps with similar metadata in the same language may be used as an example.
Thoughts?
posted
A bit complicated expressed. I needed to read this like 5 times to get what it says. And I wonder if the 2nd part is really required?
Also it doesnt include the katakana -> non-japananese cases like "Higurashi Moratorium".
posted
Metadata originally from a non-Latin alphabet language must be romanized using an accepted system deemed as standard for that language (such as Hepburn for Japanese). In cases where the exact system to use for romanization is uncertain, existing ranked maps with similar metadata in the same language may be used as an example.
This also leaves out the "not translated unless a translated title is officially provided". And again, I would prefer not to use Hepburn is because it would require the use of "ō".

In Hepburn: 金曜日(きんようび): ki + n + yo + u + bi = kinyōbi or kin'yōbi – Friday

I would rather see this as kin'youbi or kinyoubi.
posted

SapphireGhost wrote:

I would rather see this as kin'youbi or kinyoubi.
Latter one is more common and way more practicable. The aposrophes only indicate the right spelling, not "really" the right proounciation. The difference is minor (if even existing). And since romaji shall help to make stuff "read- and pronounceable" instead of "catching the entire right spelling", I would not use any apostrophes.
Moreover, trying to catch right spelling (to that extend) in romaji is weird, since writing japanese stuff with latin letters is wrong anyways. So no need for this.
posted
anything like ō or some shit with a bar over it shouldn't be necessary at all imo
it's so pointless + it removes information + not intuitive + more effort etc.
posted

SapphireGhost wrote:

Metadata originally from a non-Latin alphabet language must be romanized using an accepted system deemed as standard for that language (such as Hepburn for Japanese). In cases where the exact system to use for romanization is uncertain, existing ranked maps with similar metadata in the same language may be used as an example.
This also leaves out the "not translated unless a translated title is officially provided". And again, I would prefer not to use Hepburn is because it would require the use of "ō".

In Hepburn: 金曜日(きんようび): ki + n + yo + u + bi = kinyōbi or kin'yōbi – Friday

I would rather see this as kin'youbi or kinyoubi.
the latter example (kinyoubi) is how we've always done it and is expressed in previous ranked maps with similar metadata, so it is encompassed by the rule.

changing to:

Metadata originally from a non-Latin alphabet language must be romanized using an accepted system deemed as standard for that language (such as Hepburn Traditional for Japanese), unless an official translated title is provided by the artist. In cases where the exact system to use for romanization is uncertain, existing ranked maps with similar metadata in the same language may be used as an example.
posted

Loctav wrote:

Also it doesnt include the katakana -> non-japanese cases like "Higurashi Moratorium".
It still doesn't tell that katakana-transcribed words that only replace an english (or other language's) word, should be written in its original language (so not writing the hepburn/whatever way to transcribe the katakana, but writing the English word with right spelling)

Or is that included with that "official translation" thing? If yes, it's misleading
posted

Ephemeral wrote:

the latter example (kinyoubi) is how we've always done it and is expressed in previous ranked maps with similar metadata, so it is encompassed by the rule.
It would be better for the rule to exist without having to rely on previous ranked maps, because not all previously ranked maps have correct metadata, so "how we've always done it" isn't always good reasoning.

Does the romanisation method on http://tangorin.com/ have a name? It seems to fit with what we're looking for, other than its use of apostrophes.
posted
Hey I found no one talking about Chinese issue.

In Chinese we have a special pinyin letter that is like (yu)

Taking a Chinese word as example, 绿色 (l se)

Actually in our IME we have such letter as V, so this should be OK:

lv se

But V is never used in real pinyin, would that be suitable that we use V in the Chinese "romanized" name?
posted

xxbidiao wrote:

Hey I found no one talking about Chinese issue.

In Chinese we have a special pinyin letter that is like (yu)

Taking a Chinese word as example, 绿色 (l se)

Actually in our IME we have such letter as V, so this should be OK:

lv se

But V is never used in real pinyin, would that be suitable that we use V in the Chinese "romanized" name?
"lü se" <- it is OK to type

"lǜ sè" <- 233
posted
ü isn't a romanisation word.

i think " lv se " is the most fit at this problem. if you use " lu se " may be confused between u and ü
posted

OniJAM wrote:

xxbidiao wrote:

Hey I found no one talking about Chinese issue.

In Chinese we have a special pinyin letter that is like (yu)

Taking a Chinese word as example, 绿色 (l se)

Actually in our IME we have such letter as V, so this should be OK:

lv se

But V is never used in real pinyin, would that be suitable that we use V in the Chinese "romanized" name?
"lü se" <- it is OK to type

"lǜ sè" <- 233

mintong89 wrote:

ü isn't a romanisation word.

i think " lv se " is the most fit at this problem. if you use " lu se " may be confused between u and ü
Meh. I think lv and lü are both fine. I think of them interchangably. XD
posted
you can't write ü at romanisation title right?
posted
Gwoyeu Romatzyh looks preferable for Chinese romanisation from what I've read of it
posted

Ephemeral wrote:

Gwoyeu Romatzyh looks preferable for Chinese romanisation from what I've read of it
nono, Hanyu Pinyin is the most fit at here, because not all people can be able to understand Gwoyeu Romatzyh.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinyin
show more
Please sign in to reply.